Marketers Lack Business Credibility – Infographic

he infographic below from InventHelp says that CEO’s think marketers lack business credibility and that we don’t talk about what really matters: Sales. Do you think that’s true? I think I would have to agree.

For whatever reason as marketers we’ve chosen to try to get executives to understand marketing instead of using that time to show them why marketing matters to them: Because it drives sales. The same is true for social media. We are redefining ROI, presenting metrics that require a Ph.D. in cool to understand, and arguing that social media ROI is immeasurable. It’s not, but it will require that marketers change their point of reference.

Instead of focusing on social media metrics, start focusing on business objectives. Businesses are in business to drive more revenue and decrease costs. Why? More revenue means we are selling more. Decreasing costs means those sales add more profit to the bottom line. You’ll never hear an executive boasting about the $50,000 “value” of FREE e-books they got downloaded on their website. However, you will hear them boasting about how they drove $25,000 in real revenue from leads that came from the company’s blog.

This is a good infographic to help you start the process of connecting to the bottom line. When it comes to social reporting through Google Analytics, be cautious about putting too much weight into the numbers assigned to social media conversions and social media assists. These numbers can not be validated through the interface. We can’t see which campaigns our assists actually converted under, nor can we see the campaign history that led to a conversion.

If you are using custom URL parameters on your social links and you compare the social media traffic that social reports catches and what you know you’ve sent, don’t be surprised if you see stark differences. I love the idea of social reports, but I’m not 100% sold on the accuracy of the data. Actually, I’m not 1% sold on the accuracy of the data. I see drastic differences between traffic I know came from social and what shows up in the social reports interface. But I’m sure improvements will come over time. In the meantime, enjoy this lovely depiction of measuring Facebook and Twitter ROI.

Source: Social Media Explorer, InventHelp

Are You Ready To Disclose Every Single Step You Make? – Infographic

Through various social media platforms, we’re able to share all the necessary, and unnecessary, details of our existence. This infographic done with Visible Technologies begs the question; are we ready to literally disclose our every step?

Source: Columnfivemedia.com, Visible Technologies

Facebook’s Information About Olympics Fans – Infographic

Olympics fans like sports. But what do they Like? Facebook — who else? — holds many interesting insights there.

Social media advertising company Compass Labs recently analyzed Facebook fans of the official Olympic Games and U.S. Olympic Team pages to compile some revealing profiles of how the two groups match up. And don’t worry about a small sample size — combined, the two pages have about 5.7 million fans. Compass Labs cross-referenced Likers’ other favorited Facebook pages to find which sports, movies, brands and TV shows rate highest with each group.

Overall, the two pages corral similar demographics. Both the U.S. team and the Olympics at large have fan bases that are about 55% female, and each count the 18-25 age group as their biggest bloc. After that, though, things get pretty different.

U.S. fans list track and field as their top sport, but it’s just eighth among overall Olympics aficionados. Fans of the Games in general go for, in order: ice hockey, badminton, archery, rowing, field hockey and gymnastics. None of those crack the top 10 sports for U.S. fans. Among individual athletes, however, swimmer Michael Phelps rules with both groups.

When it comes to brand loyalty, fans of The Olympic Games tend to be a bit more worldly with their biggest favorites than fans of the U.S. Olympic Team do. National Geographic, Gucci and Air Canada take three of the top four brand spots among fans of the Games.

US Olympic Team fans’ most-like brand, according to Compass Labs? Dow Chemical Company. We’re not quite sure what to make of that either.

Source: Mashable.com, Thumbnail image courtesy of iStockphoto, cmannphoto, compass labs

The Cost Of Being Iron Man – Infographic

If you’ve been paying attention to the financial section of today’s superhero news, you will have already noted the high cost of being Batman: $682 million. That’s according to one estimate of the comic book character’s costs by by British online financial marketplace MoneySupermarket.com.

Big whoop, says Tony Stark.

The cost of being Iron Man, from the tip of his gold-titanium exoskeleton to the last drop of fuel in his Audi R8, adds up to more than $1.6 billion, according to one estimate by — you guessed it — MoneySupermarket.com.

We’re a little more confident in this estimate, however. Whereas the Batman study cited only “our research,” this one lists a range of sites with expertise in movie, comics and cars.

Or maybe it’s just that Marvel (another source) likes to exaggerate in its pages more than DC Comics does. Whichever it is, we’re hooked on the format, and can’t wait to see the infographic on the high cost of being Superman.

Source: Mashable.com, moneysupermarket.com

Largest Payouts In Sports – Infographic

In most sports, the big money is in the personal contracts. But there is still a lot of prize money to be had for the victors in tournaments and other official events. Even the losers can walk away with millions. We’ve broken down the payments for the ten highest paying sporting events, based on a list compiled by Forbes.

Source: Visual.ly

Self-Obsession, Narcissism and Social Networking – Infographic

With 90 percent of U.S. internet users having signed up for at least one social network, and one out of every eight people on the planet active on Facebook, social media has come a long, long way in a very brief period of time.

Indeed, one in every five minutes online is now spent using these social channels, a figure that has more than doubled since 2007. In each and every minute, we generate some 694,980 Facebook status updates and write 532,080 tweets. And 80 percent of those posts are about our favourite person – ourselves.

Yep, if there’s one thing social media has revealed very clearly it’s the level of narcissism and self-obsession that we almost all have. More than one third (35 percent) of users tag themselves in the 250 million photos that are uploaded daily to social platforms, and people with high levels of self-belief (or, conversely, very low self esteem) spend more than an hour every day on Facebook.

This infographic takes a closer look at the psychology of social networking.

Source: mediabistro.com, Psychology Degree.

Social Media Marketing VS. Traditional Marketing – Infographic

Social media has rapidly integrated itself into our everyday lives, both personal and professional, and it’s perhaps had no greater impact than on the world of marketing, with consumers and brands seeing enormous benefits and changes.

But how does social media compare to traditional marketing? What are the pros and cons of each?

The advantages of social media marketing are numerous.

It’s cheaper. A lot cheaper. You can reach 1,000 people for a fraction of the cost using social media than you can through television, billboards or even email
Social media is the only marketing platform that allows you to engage and interact with your consumers – it’s a two-way relationship, which can be hugely lucrative for brands
The results are measurable, and marketers can take immediate action to spot trends and re-align campaigns

It’s not all gravy, though. Social media campaigns can be time consuming and the impact can disseminate very quickly, whereas traditional marketing campaigns, certainly in television, can produce short term results that have greater tangibility.

This infographic from Kuhcoon.com takes a closer look at social media vs traditional marketing.

Source: mediabistro.com, kuhcoon.com

How Dictation Software Can Improve Your Workflow And Retirement Savings – Infographic

We all know the pen is mightier than the sword, but for 21st-century storytellers, the voice could be the one tool to rule them all. With speech-recognition software such as Siri and Dragon Naturally Speaking becoming more widely available to users, it’s time to ask yourself: How can I improve my workflow with dictation tools?

A new infographic from Carissa Newark of accountingdegree.net lays out just how much faster you can get work done with these tools, which can process information three times faster when compared to average-speed typing. It’s a great advantage for writers, especially those of us who may never type as fast as record holder Sean Wrona, who recently clocked a key-smacking velocity of 256 wpm at the Ultimate Typing Championship.

For now, dictation tools top out at a speed that’s about as fast as most of us can talk, but imagine if these tools could actually keep up with some of the world’s greatest speed-speakers? Guinness World record holder Steve Woodmore would need just over three hours to complete a 120,000 word novel using dictation tools that could keep up with him and his 637 wpm speed, or just over 10 words per second. We lowly plebes here at Mashable are probably closer to the average speaker at two words per second.

Source: Mashable.com, accountingdegree.net

Social Media And The Fashion Retailers – Infographic

Shopping is an incredibly interactive experience with many elements that can sway our decision making, from the visual sharing of photos to the opinions and recommendations that our friends and family give.

These activities lend themselves so well to the world of social media, think about how you can “like” products on Facebook, leave comments on pictures, share details of new purchases and pin clothes and accessories that you want to a Pinterest board. Fashion retailers know the benefits of being an active part of this ever-social, online world.

The issue that has become apparent though, is that many retailers try too hard to promote their brand through their own channels and come across as the pushy shop assistant, but that’s not what social media is about. Nielsen research tell us that “92% of consumers around the world now trust earned media such as word of mouth recommendations from friends and family above all other forms of advertising”.

Social media works in the same way, people do not always listen to a brand’s own Facebook page, this is why it is important to earn the respect of your community and transform individuals into brand advocates that will promote your products and offer their own recommendations. Seeing a friend like a brand or product online may give you extra confidence in your purchase decision.

Three retailers that have seen noticeable benefits through social media are Burberry, Lorna Jane and Victoria’s Secret. Burberry saw profits increase 21% after actively participating in social media. Lorna Jane’s online revenue grew 400% after their Facebook page began to drive as much traffic as two offline retail stores. Victoria’s Secret uses custom designed tabs in order to share the different elements of the brand story and as a result have grown a 19 million strong Facebook fan base.

So what exactly is the benefit of being “liked” on Facebook? Well, research shows that Facebookers are 51% more likely to make a purchase after becoming a fan and Facebook fans spend on average 117% more in store than those who are not part of your fan base.

Source: Sticki Digital Media,

Social Commerce IQ: Fashion – Infographic

F-commerce solution provider, 8thBridge has just published its latest in its series of social commerce reports covering different industry verticals (free download). This time, it’s the fashion industry, and the 104 page report is a careful analysis of the sector and includes a ranking of the top 200 fashion brands in terms of their ‘Social Commerce IQ’ (how smart these brands are in fusing social and sales technology). Top line; Shoe Dazzle dazzles and Manolo Blahnik sucks (last FB status update – March 2008).

Our top three take-outs…Read More

Source: Social Commerce Today, 8th Bridge,