Tag Archives: Politics

Understanding The Fiscal Cliff – Infographic

Millionaire Corner surveys investors to obtain insights into their financial needs and preferences. Research is conducted in partnership with Spectrem Group, the premier market research and consulting firm in the wealth and retirement industries. This educational infographic explains the “Fiscal Cliff,” and offers possible solutions.

Source: Millionaires CornerVisual.ly,

Mobile Is Transforming Political Engagement – Infographic

There’s no denying that we’re a much more mobile nation than we were four years ago. That switch to mobile is affecting not only how we communicate with each other, but also how we engage politically.

As of late September, a reported 88% of registered voters had a cell phone of some kind, with 53% of those voters toting around smartphones. For this year’s election, one in 10 voters made a political contribution via text message or a mobile app, and 37% of voters used their mobile phone for political information and discussion with others.

Payvia, a company that powered political contributions for the Obama and Romney campaigns, created this infographic breaking down some of the numbers from this year, and making some predictions on what we can expect with the 2016 election.

Take a look at their findings below, then give us your thoughts in the comments — how do you think mobile will have evolved by the 2016 election?

Source: Mashable.com

2012 Election: Who Owns Who – Infographic

President Barack Obama raised far more money via direct contributions, but Governor Mitt Romney’s campaign edged ahead via “outside spending” – including Super PACS largely enabled by the Citizens’ United Supreme Court decision which now allows corporations, unions and issue advocacy organizations unlimited campaign spending.

Source: Visual.ly

Obama vs. Romney: Dialing For Dollars And Votes – Infographic

During this year’s U.S. election, candidates channeled the power of apps and text messaging to appeal to voters, promote their party platform and fundraise.

CallerSmart analyzed how much telephones — smartphones, texts and anonymous phone banks — are bringing democracy to a digital environment. As it turns out, President Barack Obama or Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney could thank cellphones for being elected on Nov. 6.

SEE ALSO: How Are Apps Shaping the 2012 Election? [INFOGRAPHIC]

Obama and Romney developed personalized mobile apps to tap into a more connected constituency. The president’s app was more popular on Androids, while Romney’s was downloaded more on iPhones. What’s more, this year’s presidential election is the first to allow donations via text message.

For more on the use of mobile in the 2012 election, check out the infographic below:

Source: Mashable.com

A Big Storm Requires Big Government

A Big Storm Requires Big Government – NYTimes.com.

…Disaster coordination is one of the most vital functions of “big government,” which is why Mitt Romney wants to eliminate it. At a Republican primary debate last year, Mr. Romney was asked whether emergency management was a function that should be returned to the states. He not only agreed, he went further.

“Absolutely,” he said. “Every time you have an occasion to take something from the federal government and send it back to the states, that’s the right direction. And if you can go even further and send it back to the private sector, that’s even better.” Mr. Romney not only believes that states acting independently can handle the response to a vast East Coast storm better than Washington, but that profit-making companies can do an even better job. He said it was “immoral” for the federal government to do all these things if it means increasing the debt.

From CNN on 10/30/2012:

– Obama declared a state of emergency in Virginia late Monday, ordering federal assistance on top of state and local efforts. Republican Gov. Bob McDonnell had asked for a federal emergency declaration, which would free up funding. By the way, McDonnell is not the only Republican Governor asking for federal help. Ask Chris Christie in New Jersey.

After Mr. Romney’s 2011 remarks recirculated on Monday, his nervous campaign announced that he does not want to abolish FEMA, though he still believes states should be in charge of emergency management. Those in Hurricane Sandy’s path are fortunate that, for now, that ideology has not replaced sound policy.

–Mittens180 at his best again–

Living in NYC, I am wondering how the state of New York should master all the burdens of “Sandy”. And if the state would have to, how would turn this out for the people.

In a week the hammer comes down and we go to elect the President for the next 4 years. Sometimes, when you are not sure on how to vote, life sends you a message.

Over the past 18 month Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan have put their ideas on the table. They have explained how the country needs to save money on the expense of those that depend on the government and have made 180 turns when it comes to stand for it in public.  As “Sandy” clearly shows, those that are depending on the government are not only the poor. When it comes down to it, 90% of us are depending on government support, one way or the other. It is easy to deny the fact when the sun is shining and no emergency is visible, but when the emergency occurs, we all ask for it, Republican or Democrat. Don’t be fooled by Romney and Ryan (I am not saying Republicans), both of them are out there to take personal advantage on the expense of all of us.

Young Voters Inspired By Facebook – Infographic

As election day approaches, you might be getting sick of the political bickering in your News Feed. You can try to fight it, but political participation on social media is contagious.

Since 2004, politicians like Howard Dean and Ron Paul have been using social and new media to advance their causes and put themselves in front of younger voters who aren’t just tech-savvy, they’re tech-centric. Facebook and Twitter are powerful tools for spreading information and news, as Barack Obama used to his advantage in his 2008 bid for the presidency.

But Facebook can do more than just familiarize voters with a candidate or let them “Like” a campaign page. For the younger demographic of new voters, social media can be a push to the ballot.

SEE ALSO: Social Is the Secret Weapon in Local Politics

A study out of the University of California found that social messages functioned as highly effective reminders to vote. When pictures of friends appeared in the messages, potential voters were more inspired to take action. Altogether, the study directly influenced the 2010 midterm elections by inspiring more than 300,000 voters to hit the polls. In the end, all that political bickering might only increase the chances of higher voter turnout in the long run.

Check out this infographic from Online College Courses to learn more about the way social media and politics are merging in 2012.

Source: Mashable.com

Election 2012: The Candidates’ Social Media Profiles – Infographic

Either Barack Obama or Mitt Romney is going to be elected as President of the United States of American in a couple weeks. The recent debates have been very entertaining to say the least.

With Facebook hitting one billion users and Twitter registering at about 500 million, we here at Wallaroo Media thought we’d take a dive into the presidential candidates’ social media profiles. We found some very interesting data. Do you think that the information below can be used to predict a winner in this year’s election?

Source: Wallaroomedia

Who Will Social Media Users Vote For? – Infographic

You’ve probably seen the results of dozens of election polls by now, but what about research specifically concentrating on social media users? How will they be voting in the U.S. presidential election coming up on Nov. 6? To find out, market research firm Lab42 surveyed 500 U.S. social media users.

In the survey, respondents were asked who they planned to vote for, and in an interesting twist, who they’ll be voting against. The survey digs deeper, finding out if spouses agree on presidential candidates, which issues have the most impact on voters’ decisions, and who is just not going to vote at all.

The most significant findings are about the closely watched independents, those who say they aren’t affiliated with either the Republican or Democratic parties. According to the survey, the race is nowhere near over for denizens of social media, with significant percentages still undecided, especially those who aren’t registered. One statistic that made us laugh: 7% of registered independents have changed their minds four or more times.

And really, 29% of the respondents didn’t even know what “GOP” stands for…? Ouch.

By the way, if you’re having trouble making up your mind, here’s a powerful tool, I Side With, a website that gives you a detailed questionnaire and lets you discover how your political views match up with the candidates.

The survey was conducted Oct. 2-4, 2012 with 500 Facebook and Twitter users responding. A lot has happened since Oct. 4, the day after the first debate in which Obama’s performance was widely panned. However, the next two debates were seen as mostly wins for the Obama campaign, so it’s possible these results could somewhat balance out. And, according to a spokesperson from Lab42, “The majority of respondents took the survey after the first debate, and I think the only stat that may have changed is the undecided vote, which will continue to change up until the election.”

What do you think? Does this survey reflect your impression of the voting landscape in social media?

Source: Mashable.com, Lab42.com